Since it is sold over-the-counter, insurers generally only pay for it with a doctor’s prescription. The new Affordable Care Act promises to cover morning-after pills, meaning no co-pays, but again only with a prescription.

Read:Dr. Regina Benjamin: “Health Is In Everything We Do.”

The results of the study were released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s based on in-person interviews of more than 12,000 women in 2006 through 2010. It was the agency’s first in-depth report on that issue, said Kimberly Daniels, the study’s lead author.

The study also found:

—Among different age groups, women in their early 20s were more likely to have taken a morning-after pill. About 1 in 4 did.

—About 1 in 5 never-married women had taken a morning-after pill, compared to just 1 in 20 married women.

—Of the women who used the pill, 59 per cent said they had done it only once, 24 per cent said twice, and 17 per cent said three or more times.

A woman who uses emergency contraception multiple times “needs to be thinking about a more regular form” of birth control, noted Lawrence Finer, director of domestic research for the Guttmacher Institute, a non-profit group that does research on reproductive health.

Also on Thursday, the CDC released a report on overall contraception use. Among its many findings, 99 per cent of women who’ve had sex used some sort of birth control. That includes 82 per cent who used birth control pills and 93 per cent whose partner had used a condom.

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