The Church of Scientology describes itself as working for “a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war, where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights, and where man is free to rise to greater heights.”

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Scientology teaches that people are immortal beings who have forgotten their true nature.  Its method of spiritual rehabilitation is a type of counseling known as auditing, in which practitioners aim to consciously re-experience painful or traumatic events in their past in order to free themselves of their limiting effects. Study materials and auditing courses are made available to members in return for specified donations Scientology is legally recognized as a tax-exempt religion in the United States and some other countries,and the Church of Scientology emphasizes this as proof that it is a bona fide religion. In other countries, notably Canada, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom,

Scientology does not have comparable religious status Scientology was developed by L. Ron Hubbard as a successor to his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. Dianetics uses a counseling technique known as auditing, developed by Hubbard to enable conscious recall of traumatic events in an individual’s past. It was originally intended to be a new psychotherapy and was not expected to become the foundation for a new religion.

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Hubbard, an American writer of pulp fiction, especially science fiction, first published his ideas on the human mind in the Explorers Club Journal and the May 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction magazine. Two of Hubbard’s key supporters at the time were John W. Campbell Jr., the editor of Astounding Science Fiction, and Dr. Joseph A. Winter. Winter, hoping to have Dianetics accepted in the medical community, submitted papers outlining the principles and methodology of Dianetic therapy to the Journal of the American Medical Association and the American Journal of Psychiatry in 1949, but these were rejected.

May 1950 saw the publication of Hubbard’s Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. His book entered the New York Times best-seller list on June 18 and stayed there until December 24 of that year. Dianetics appealed to a broad range of people who used instructions from the book and applied the method to each other, becoming practitioners themselves Hubbard found himself the leader of a growing Dianetics movement. He became a popular lecturer and established the Hubbard Dianetic Research Foundation in Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he trained his first Dianetics counselors or auditors.

Marty Rathbun  has written a book in which he utterly refutes this message. He became a Scientologist in 1977 and quickly rose to the highest ranks within the church and became a Sea Org, which troubleshoots and audits people and problems, within the organization. Marty Rathbun and Mike Rinder are the higest ranking members to have left and speak out about the mysterious group. Marty in particular had special privileges as an auditor.

According to Scientology  literature, “Auditing is a central practice in Scientology through which a practitioner is cleared of negative influences known as engrams in order to heighten spiritual awareness and access currently untapped potential. Auditing sessions involve two people: the person being audited and an auditor. The person being audited is generally referred to as a pre-Clear in public Scientology literature, although Clears continue to participate in a similar process. The auditor monitors a device known as an electro-psychometer, or E-meter. The pre-Clear holds a metal cylinder in each hand, both of which are attached by wires to the E-meter.”

Rathbun left the church in 2004 because of alleged violence he witnessed at the headquarters in Florida.

In his book he alleges :

• Physical violence permeated Scientology’s international management team. David Miscavige, leader and senior member, set the tone, routinely attacking his lieutenants. Rinder says the leader attacked him some 50 times.

• Staffers are disciplined and controlled by a multi­layered system of “ecclesiastical justice.” It includes publicly confessing sins and crimes to a group of peers, being ordered to jump into a pool fully clothed, facing embarrassing “security checks” or, worse, being isolated as a “suppressive person.” At the pinnacle of the hierarchy, Miscavige commands such power that managers follow his orders, however bizarre, with lemming-like obedience.

• Church staffers covered up how they botched the care of Lisa McPherson, a Scientologist who died after they held her 17 days in isolation at Clearwater’s Fort Harrison Hotel. He and others also reveal that Miscavige made an embarrassing miscalculation on McPherson’s Scientology counseling.

• With Miscavige calling the shots and Rathbun among those at his side, the church muscled the IRS into granting Scientology tax-exempt status. Offering fresh perspective on one of the church’s crowning moments, Rathbun details an extraordinary campaign of public pressure backed by thousands of lawsuits.

• To prop up revenues, Miscavige has turned to long-time parishioners, urging them to buy material that the church markets as must-have, improved sacred scripture.

Church officials deny the accusations. Miscavige never hit a single church staffer, not once, they said.

This ethics system  set up within keeps Scientologists striving to stay productive. It relies on the notion that at any given time, every human activity can be reduced to a statistic and everything — a group, a person, someone’s job or marriage — can be measured and placed in one of 12 “conditions.”  The lower conditions include “Confusion,” “Treason” and “Enemy.” The highest condition is “Power,” followed by “Power Change” and “Affluence.”

Moving up the ethics ladder requires that the subject pen confessions or soul-searching memos called “formulas,” which are said to better the individual as he or she examines what went wrong. These memos also can give the church a ready source of written material to use against members who would turn against Scientology.  More documents are generated when a person wants to leave, or “blow.”

In 1959, Hubbard wrote a policy stating that a person leaves as a kind of noble gesture when he can’t help himself from injuring the church. To justify leaving, Hubbard believed, the person thinks up bad things to say about the church.  Anyone who leaves has committed “overts” (harmful acts) against the church and is withholding them. The church is obligated to make such people come clean, Hubbard said, because withholding overts against Scientology can lead to suicide or death by disease.

Marty’s book, What Is Wrong With Scientology? was recently released and is available on Amazon for $17.76.

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