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GreatDepression-Blacks-SoupLineThey say that you must always know where you came from in order to know where you are going to. It is the natural progression of life to learn from our predecessors. If we do not, then we lose all that we have because the lesson is lost.

We all complain about our jobs, prices, lack of money. There was a generation that survived worst off than us. Imagine getting just a loaf of bread and a container of milk. You can’t right? I know some people in our community are pretty bad off. Yet, it is not as bad as The Great Depression.

The great depression defined a spirit in America.The Great Depression marked the bitter and abrupt end to the post-World War 1 bubble that left America giddy with promise in the 1920s. Near the end of the 1930s the country was beginning to recover from the crash, but many in small towns and rural areas were still poverty-stricken.  The Library of Congress discovered these rare photos in their archives. It is worth the  five minutes to go take a look by clicking here to view this poignant photos.

The Great Depression of the 1930s worsened the already bleak economic situation of African Americans. They were the first to be laid off from their jobs, and they suffered from an unemployment rate two to three times that of whites. In early public assistance programs African Americans often received substantially less aid than whites, and some charitable organizations even excluded blacks from their soup kitchens. Things are hard for us but, we need to know that we as a people have always survived.

See how we pass on the meaning of our lives in this difficult time by viewing  R&B  stars Marsha Ambrosius and Miguel’s  “Face To Face “ and   Mary Mary Covers Bruno Mars “Just The Way You Are” With Soul [Video]

Here is a clip from the early 1930’s :

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