Apple Cider Vinegar: What’s It Actually Good For?

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    Apple sitting on a wooden surface with a glass of apple cider vinegar

    Of all the homegrown, “cure-all” tonics that exist today, apple cider vinegar continues to be one of the most popular ones.

    But why?

    While the scientific jury is still out  regarding some of apple cider vinegar’s believed benefits, a few studies have actually proven the validity of quite a few of its healthful claims, such as:

    Weight Loss

    Scientists suspect that apple cider vinegar actually reduces the amount of starch calories that enter your bloodstream. The acetic acid in apple cider vinegar helps to control your appetite, helps boost your metabolism, and limits belly bloat.

    Two tablespoons in warm water daily tends to be the most popular recipe.

    Digestion Problem

    If you’re having tummy trouble, apple cider vinegar may help contain the problem, thanks to its antibiotic properties. Folk remedy experts also say that it can help soothe intestinal spasms.

    Try mixing one or two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in water.

    Sore Throat

    As soon as you feel a sore throat approaching, try taking some apple cider vinegar to help control the infection – most germs can’t survive in the acidic environment that vinegar creates.

    Per experts, combine 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar with 1/4 cup warm water and gargle every hour or so.

    …and speaking of cold symptoms, apple cider vinegar is also believed to help clear a stuffy nose, too.

    Diabetes

    According to WebMD, the effect of vinegar on blood sugar levels is a well-researched topic, and studies have demonstrated that vinegar may very effective in lowering glucose levels. For example, in a 2007 study of 11 people with type 2 diabetes found that taking two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed lowered glucose levels in the morning by 4%-6%.

    High Cholesterol

    A 2006 study showed evidence (at least in rats) that vinegar may be able to help lower cholesterol. But more studies involving human participants need to be conducted before any more conclusive findings can be obtained.

    As always, talk to a doctor first…

    While some experts do point to some helpful, and hopeful, benefits of apple cider vinegar, you should talk to your doctor before adding apple cider vinegar to your daily health regimen, particularly if you’re thinking to take it to help tackle a more major medical issue, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, stomach trouble or high cholesterol.

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